Coronavirus

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Hype
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Re: Coronavirus

#301 Post by Hype » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:19 am

kv wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 4:17 pm
Pandemonium wrote:
Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:14 pm
Rather disturbingly, a local amo store had a several hundred person deep line around the building this afternoon.
I wouldn't let that worry anyone too much...

I've hunted and shot guns my whole life..Everytime something big happens they run the gun stores outa stock...so half the line is normal people buying stuff before it's gone for a while...and a lot of the others are first time gun buyers thinking home protection with zero ill will.....I've had a couple friends who never owned guns wanting my insight because they want something for the house...it's the exact same mindset of the people grabbing TP "this is something I can handle" in a hard to handle time
I think you nailed the psychology of it. It’s a superstitious reaction, because it ignores the reality of the situation and focuses on some tiny arbitrary feature of it as if it will make a difference overall.

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#302 Post by chaos » Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:22 am

A toilet paper calculator:

https://howmuchtoiletpaper.com




Juana
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Re: Coronavirus

#303 Post by Juana » Sun Mar 22, 2020 1:59 pm

Austin area, Houston area, Dallas area are all supposed to hunker down and only leave for emergencies looks like I will be online a lot more

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Bandit72
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Re: Coronavirus

#304 Post by Bandit72 » Sun Mar 22, 2020 3:33 pm



This has been on, and yet people in the UK are still going out. We are on course to match this in two weeks. :nyrexall:

There is something really haunting about the noise those life support machines make...

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Artemis
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Re: Coronavirus

#305 Post by Artemis » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:04 pm

More haunting than the sound of the life supports is that they're still waiting for the epidemic to peak. :scared:

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Artemis
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Re: Coronavirus

#306 Post by Artemis » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:10 pm

Last night a few friends and I had a virtual( I had a real one) drink on Google Hangouts. We chatted for about an hour, talked about how we were feeling, what changes we had to make to adjust. A couple of friends with children talked about what they were going to do to keep up with school work and maintain some sort of routine. Anyway, it was therapeutic and I highly recommend it.

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#307 Post by chaos » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:47 pm

A White House press briefing just ended about 10 minutes ago. It was an utter embarrassment. It lasted for about an hour and a half, the last 30 minutes of which was truly a lunatic, stream of consciousness word salad sprinkled with salmonella. I have to stop torturing myself by watching these briefings.

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Artemis
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Re: Coronavirus

#308 Post by Artemis » Sun Mar 22, 2020 6:35 pm

Very interesting...

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/22/heal ... GBVCoA4pPI
Lost Sense of Smell May Be Peculiar Clue to Coronavirus Infection

Doctor groups are recommending testing and isolation for people who lose their ability to smell and taste, even if they have no other symptoms.

By Roni Caryn Rabin
March 22, 2020
Updated 7:01 p.m. ET

A mother who was infected with the coronavirus couldn’t smell her baby’s full diaper. Cooks who can usually name every spice in a restaurant dish can’t smell curry or garlic, and food tastes bland. Others say they can’t pick up the sweet scent of shampoo or the foul odor of kitty litter.

Anosmia, the loss of sense of smell, and ageusia, an accompanying diminished sense of taste, have emerged as peculiar telltale signs of Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, and possible markers of infection.

On Friday, British ear, nose and throat doctors, citing reports from colleagues around the world, called on adults who lose their senses of smell to isolate themselves for seven days, even if they have no other symptoms, to slow the disease’s spread. The published data is limited, but doctors are concerned enough to raise warnings.

“We really want to raise awareness that this is a sign of infection and that anyone who develops loss of sense of smell should self-isolate,” Prof. Claire Hopkins, president of the British Rhinological Society, wrote in an email. “It could contribute to slowing transmission and save lives.”

She and Nirmal Kumar, president of ENT UK, a group representing ear, nose and throat doctors in Britain, issued a joint statement urging health care workers to use personal protective equipment when treating any patients who have lost their senses of smell, and advised against performing nonessential sinus endoscopy procedures on anyone, because the virus replicates in the nose and the throat and an exam can prompt coughs or sneezes that expose the doctor to a high level of virus.

Two ear, nose and throat specialists in Britain who have been infected with the coronavirus are in critical condition, Dr. Hopkins said. Earlier reports from Wuhan, China, where the coronavirus first emerged, had warned that ear, nose and throat specialists as well as eye doctors were infected and dying in large numbers, Dr. Hopkins said.

The British physicians cited reports from other countries indicating that significant numbers of coronavirus patients experienced anosmia, saying that in South Korea, where testing has been widespread, 30 percent of 2,000 patients who tested positive experienced anosmia as their major presenting symptom (these were mild cases).

The American Academy of Otolaryngology on Sunday posted information on its website saying that mounting anecdotal evidence indicates that lost or reduced sense of smell and loss of taste are significant symptoms associated with Covid-19, and that they have been seen in patients who ultimately tested positive with no other symptoms.

The symptoms, in the absence of allergies or sinusitis, should alert doctors to screen patients for the virus and “warrant serious consideration for self isolation and testing of these individuals,” the academy said. The organization has reminded its members that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged all clinicians to prioritize urgent and emergency visits for the next several weeks and to reschedule elective and routine procedures.

“There is evolving evidence that otolaryngologists are among the highest risk group when performing upper airway surgeries and examinations,” said a notice posted on the academy’s website on Friday. “A high rate of transmission of Covid-19 to otolaryngologists has been reported from China, Italy and Iran, many resulting in death.”

Dr. Rachel Kaye, an assistant professor of otolaryngology at Rutgers, said colleagues in New Rochelle, N.Y., which has been the center of an outbreak, first alerted her to the smell loss associated with the coronavirus, sharing that patients who had first complained of anosmia later tested positive for the coronavirus. “This raised a lot of alarms for me personally,” Dr. Kaye said, because those patients “won’t know to self quarantine.”

“Most ENTs have on their own accord tried to scale down,” she said, adding that her department at Rutgers had already started using personal protective equipment and stopped performing nonessential exams.

In the areas of Italy most heavily affected by the virus, doctors say they have concluded that loss of taste and smell is an indication that a person who otherwise seems healthy is in fact carrying the virus and may be spreading it to others.

“Almost everybody who is hospitalized has this same story,” said Dr. Marco Metra, chief of the cardiology department at the main hospital in Brescia, where 700 of 1,200 inpatients have the coronavirus. “You ask about the patient’s wife or husband. And the patient says, ‘My wife has just lost her smell and taste but otherwise she is well.’ So she is likely infected, and she is spreading it with a very mild form.”

A study from South Korea, where widespread testing has been done, found that 30 percent of some 2,000 patients who tested positive for the coronavirus reported experiencing anosmia.

Hendrik Streeck, a German virologist from the University of Bonn who went from house to house in the country’s Heinsberg district to interview coronavirus patients, has said in interviews that at least two-thirds of the more than 100 he talked to with mild disease reported experiencing loss of smell and taste lasting several days.

Another physician who studied a cluster of coronavirus patients in Germany said in an email that roughly half of the patients had experienced a smell or taste disorder, and that the sensory loss usually presented after the first symptoms of respiratory illness, but could be used to distinguish people who should be tested.

Dr. Clemens Wendtner, a professor of medicine at the Academic Teaching Hospital of Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, said that the patients regained their ability to smell after a few days or weeks, and that the loss occurred regardless of how sick they got or whether they were congested. Using nasal drops or sprays did not help, Dr. Wendtner said.


Several American patients who have had symptoms consistent with the coronavirus, but who have not been tested or are still awaiting test results, described losing their senses of smell and taste, even though their noses were clear and they were not congested.

Andrew Berry, 30, developed a fever and body aches about 10 days ago, and then a sore throat and debilitating headaches. He tested negative for influenza and has not gotten the result of a coronavirus test taken four days ago, but his physician was convinced that he had the virus, he said.

Now, Mr. Berry said, he literally cannot smell the coffee.

“Even with a clear nose, I just realized I couldn’t smell the food that I was cooking, and I couldn’t taste the food that I was making,” said Mr. Berry, a tattoo artist based in Orlando, Fla. He was cooking a plantain dish with onions and vinegar, yet he could not smell it.

Amy Plattmier, a woman from Brooklyn, was not tested for the coronavirus during a recent illness, but her husband then became sick and had a positive test. Ms. Plattmier said she usually had a very sensitive nose, but now could barely smell anything — not the bleach she was using to clean the counters, which usually makes her feel nauseated, or the dog’s accident in the bathroom, which she cleaned up.

Mr. Berry has also lost some weight, because he has not had much of an appetite. “Hopefully it’s not a prolonged effect,” he said. “I can imagine it changes the quality of life.”

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Larry B.
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Re: Coronavirus

#309 Post by Larry B. » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:08 am

That’s interesting indeed...

And about virtual meetings, last night we ‘met’ with some friends to have a chat and play Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes, and it was way more fun and natural than I expected. Just talking about the awkwardness of it all seemed to bring some relief to the rooms.

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Artemis
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Re: Coronavirus

#310 Post by Artemis » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:36 am

I really like that Justin Trudeau took a minute to address children. President Cheeto could take some lessons fron him on how to show empathy.


Canada is now over 2000 cases. :scared:

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Bandit72
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Re: Coronavirus

#311 Post by Bandit72 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:26 pm

Looks like we’re going on ‘lockdown’ from tonight. A week too late IMO.

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Larry B.
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Re: Coronavirus

#312 Post by Larry B. » Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:37 pm

Bandit72 wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:26 pm
Looks like we’re going on ‘lockdown’ from tonight. A week too late IMO.
Ugh. But better late then never. The level of irresponsibility and greed from the higher ups is nothing short of despicable.

In Chile, we're in curfew from 10pm to 5am, supposedly so that people stay home... and yet, the dictatorship doesn't seem to have a problem with the hundreds of thousands of workers who are still having to cram into the subway and buses to get to and from their jobs, coughing into each other and all that. But at night, military on the streets making sure no-one visits no-one else.

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Bandit72
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Re: Coronavirus

#313 Post by Bandit72 » Mon Mar 23, 2020 4:03 pm

Larry B. wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 2:37 pm
Bandit72 wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 1:26 pm
Looks like we’re going on ‘lockdown’ from tonight. A week too late IMO.
Ugh. But better late then never. The level of irresponsibility and greed from the higher ups is nothing short of despicable.

In Chile, we're in curfew from 10pm to 5am, supposedly so that people stay home... and yet, the dictatorship doesn't seem to have a problem with the hundreds of thousands of workers who are still having to cram into the subway and buses to get to and from their jobs, coughing into each other and all that. But at night, military on the streets making sure no-one visits no-one else.
Yes, I think here, some people still aren’t “getting it”. People still going to caravan parks, going to parks, going to the seaside. I’ve felt really fucking guilty going out just to one shop. In London, the underground was as rammed as ever and I think this has what has led to these new measures. I guarantee it’s still going to take 3 or 4 days for people to realise that they can’t go out. My parents are healthy and active but are 82 and 76. I had to go for fruit and veg for them on Sunday (Mother’s Day) and leave a shopping bag on their doorstep. It’s so sad, but we all know what we need to do.

How long do you think this is will go on for? I’m guessing at least a year.

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Re: Coronavirus

#314 Post by Larry B. » Mon Mar 23, 2020 4:11 pm

I'd imagine that in our capitalist countries, they'll try to find a sweet spot of confirmed cases and a 'manageable' number of serious cases, people needing hospitalisation.

For instance, let's say that the UK can cope with 1,000 people hospitalised for covid-19, and that for every 10,000 confirmed cases, 1,000 of them are serious. So they might try to get the number of confirmed cases under control, and as people die or recover, that number might come down to 7,000 and they'll relax some measures, until the number rises again to 8,500, and so on. Until there's enough immunity in the population (which could take around 18-24 months) or until there's a working vaccine (18 months min).

Probably the most compassionate thing would be something very different from that, but considering "they" see this mostly as resource management to keep a relatively healthy economy, they could well do something like that.

I'd also imagine that at some point, international resorts will re-open with tight health measures, airlines might also include checks before boarding, things like that. The machine has got to keep going, and we're only into month 1 of the true world-wide crisis. They'll find a way.

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Re: Coronavirus

#315 Post by Hype » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:05 pm

There are a lot of open factors in how long all of this will continue. China appears to have gotten things relatively under control fairly quickly. But they did so in a draconian and kind of stupid way in part. And there are inklings that there is a second wave of infections starting there.

If the rest of the world can make this somewhat manageable over the course of several months (basically, two very hard months per region), then it's possible it will all kind of fall back down to a more reasonable thing somewhat like, though more dangerous to some people than, the seasonal flu.

But if we can't figure out how to slow the spread, and keep it contained when it pops back up, there are some indications we might need a near-permanent strategy of periodic waves of closures and distancing until we have a vaccine and/or it mutates into something less virulent.

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Matz
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Re: Coronavirus

#316 Post by Matz » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:26 pm

Hype wrote:
Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:05 pm
distancing until we have a vaccine and/or it mutates into something less virulent.
On that note here is an article about this, translated from Danish by google:




The coronavirus mutates. And it can do that many times.

That is no doubt after researchers discovered 40 coronavirus mutations - in Iceland alone. It writes Information.

Here, the health authorities have tested almost 10,000 people for coronavirus infection in collaboration with private genetics company Decode Genetics.

In addition, sequencing of the infections found has been done.

- We have found 40 island-specific mutations in viruses. We found someone who had a mixture of viruses. They had viruses from before and after the mutation, Decode Genetics director Kári Stefánsson told Information.

A total of 473 infected persons have been registered in Iceland.

The health authorities in the country have tested anyone who has shown symptoms that were sick or at particular risk of getting coronavirus.

In addition, approximately 5500 people who have tested Decode Genetics but who did not show symptoms and were not in the risk group.

Through gene sequencing, Iceland has been able to map where the virus comes from. Some Icelanders have been infected in Austria, others in Italy - and a smaller group has been infected in England.

Professor Allan Randrup Thomsen from the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the University of Copenhagen is not surprised by the many mutations.

- Coronavirus is known as a virus that can mutate reasonably violently. We have seen reports of variants from China already. In that way, it fits well with what one expects, he tells Information.

He expects the coronavirus to develop in the longer term to be more contagious but less dangerous to those it affects.

The health authorities in Iceland believe that the knowledge gained about coronavirus mutations can be used worldwide in the fight against the worldwide virus.

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Artemis
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Re: Coronavirus

#317 Post by Artemis » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:00 am

Good piece in the Atlantic.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archi ... st/608629/
IDEAS

‘Do More—Fast. Don’t Wait.’
Denmark, which is basically freezing its economy, has a message for America.


Around the world, countries are seeking to lock down their populations to halt the spread of the coronavirus, “freeze” their economies in place, and help people survive the ice age by any means necessary.

Denmark’s version of ice-age economics goes like this: To discourage mass layoffs, the government will pay employers up to 90 percent of the salaries of workers who go home and don’t work. The plan could require the government to spend as much as 13 percent of its GDP in three months—roughly the equivalent of a $2.5 trillion stimulus in the United States spread out over just 13 weeks.

In the 48 hours since I first wrote about this plan, I have heard from politicians and policy makers around the world, including Spain, the UK, and Australia. To go deeper on this radical idea, I spoke on Monday with Peter Hummelgaard, the Employment Minister of Denmark. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Derek Thompson: You’re the employment minister for a country adopting one of the most radical economic plans in the world. Before we get to the specifics of what you’re doing, give me your outlook on this crisis.

Peter Hummelgaard: What we’re trying to do is to freeze the economy. This is very different from 12 years ago when, as you might say in American terms, we bailed out Wall Street and forgot about Main Street. This time around, it’s about preserving Main Street as much as we can.

After the lockdown, we knew that people would get fired in vast numbers. We wanted to avoid most firings, entirely. The best idea we came up with was for governments to pay businesses to keep employees.

It’s a radical plan. But radical times need radical responses. You could say it puts the old Ronald Reagan quote on its head: We are the government, and we are here to help.

Thompson: Tell me exactly how this plan works, because it’s unlike anything I’ve ever heard. Let’s say I’m a restaurant owner in Copenhagen who has to shut down my business for the next few months. I have 10 employees and, without income, I might have to lay off all of them in a week. I ask you for help. What happens now?

Hummelgaard: First, all of your employees would be eligible to receive income compensation as long as you keep them on contract. That means they are sent home, and the government pays you, the restaurant owner, up to 90 percent of their salaries—up to about $4,000 a month—which you would pay to the workers you still have on contract.

Second, the government would compensate you for fixed costs, like rent. For example, the government will pay a portion of your rent depending how much your revenue declines.

Third, if any of your employees get sick from the coronavirus, the government will pay their sick leave from day one. Generally, in Denmark, the employers are responsible for the first 30 days of paid sick leave.

Finally, we decided to postpone the deadlines of taxes like the value-added tax, and we’ve encouraged banks to extend credit to companies like yours.

Thompson: This is such a generous program. Couldn’t I just defraud you? Couldn’t I pretend to send my workers home but secretly ask them to come into the restaurant and help with a secret delivery business? How do you prevent rampant, massive fraud?

Hummelgaard: We’re not naive. Of course there will be companies that try to take unfair advantage of this. But in Danish society, there has been broad support for these initiatives, and these programs have been rolled out with a large degree of trust.

While at first there won’t be thorough control mechanisms, since these programs are being implemented very fast, we have a few ways to find fraud. Employers have to have an authorized accountant sign for their compensation applications. Also Denmark is a thoroughly digitized country. The government can see—via tax records and mobile-payment applications—if some businesses are still operating as normal. And if we do find cases of fraud, we are going to ask for the money back with a fee on top, or even charge employers with a crime.

Thompson: Am I right to say that this is like a big unemployment benefit program—except the benefits are paid through employers, to ensure that workers keep their jobs?

Hummelgaard: The traditional thing in a recession would be to expand unemployment programs, so that the people being laid off would have a strong safety net—which, in Denmark, they already do. This is the first time, at least in Danish history, that the government has paid private businesses to not fire their employees, even when their employees can’t work. It is an extraordinary scheme. But this is an extraordinary health crisis.

Thompson: In the United States, the two parties in Congress have struggled to agree on a relief package. In Denmark, you reached a tripartite agreement between three different groups—unions, employers, and the government—and within government, you have as many as 10 parties. How did Denmark move so quickly, with so many factions, to pass something so big?

Hummelgaard: In Denmark, we have a long tradition of strong unions that aren’t as ideological or as radicalized as they can be in other countries. They are used to direct negotiations with employers associations.

Over the past four decades, we have built on that tradition by having government help to solve big challenges. A couple of days after we announced the lockdown, we had an agreement by late Saturday night. And we made it public on Sunday morning. It sent a signal of trust through society — workers standing alongside businesses and government saying we would do whatever it takes, whatever is possible, to ensure a soft landing for the economy. I’m not sure you could copy this everywhere, either because unions are too weak, or because trust between unions and employers is nonexistent.

Thompson: I want to know how you’d respond to three possible critiques of this plan. First, the price tag. Denmark is prepared to spend almost 13 percent of its GDP in the next three months. Are you concerned about inflation or public debt?

Hummelgaard: If this current predicament becomes a structural problem, with mass unemployment and reduced aggregate demand, the cost to our economy and to our deficit will be much more expensive than investing in these programs upfront. That is our pure logic. That’s the economic side of it. It is more expensive to do less. Then there’s a social side of it: Unemployment creates a host of problems not only for society, but also for individuals.

Thompson: Here’s another criticism some might have: By paying people to not work—and compensating them exclusively if they avoid working—are you making it harder for workers to transition to parts of the economy that need more people, like medical-device manufacturing, or groceries, or online delivery?

Hummelgaard: No. Because we’re still seeing layoffs. This program is merely preventing more layoffs, mass layoffs. You have to remember that these compensation schemes are temporary. They are due to end in June.

Thompson: In fact, that’s the biggest concern about your plan: It’s set to end in June. If you succeed in slowing the spread of the virus, there may still be lots of infections in the early summer. How will the economy transition to normal if there are still people carrying the virus in early summer?

Hummelgaard: The important thing to remember is that our health system must be able to treat those who need treatment. If the virus spreads in Denmark as fast as it has in some regions in Italy and Spain, our health system will have no capacity. But by [slowing] the spread of the virus, our health system will have the capacity to treat those with the disease. That’s the health strategy. It’s not on my table, but it’s part of the overall strategy of government.

If we need to keep the lockdown for a longer period of time, we may rethink our plan and come up with new initiatives. But it’s important to say that we will do more.

Thompson: Last question: In the U.S., we still don’t have an emergency relief deal. What’s your message to American lawmakers?

Hummelgaard: Do more—fast. Don’t wait. The main focus should be to bridge partisan divides and to make sure that the rescue package for the economy is a rescue for Main Street, not just for Wall Street. Preserve the income and jobs for ordinary working people, and also preserve small businesses. The jury is still out on our initiatives, but I’m confident in our approach.

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Re: Coronavirus

#318 Post by mockbee » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:11 am

Image


https://covidtracking.com/data/
The coronavirus outbreak in the US continues to grow, and after weeks of delays, large-scale testing has started to be rolled out in several states.
The COVID Tracking Project, a test-tracking resource from two journalists at The Atlantic and the founder of a medical-data startup, publishes frequently updated estimates of the number of coronavirus tests conducted in each state.
New York and Washington, two epicenters of the US outbreak, have tested a higher share of their populations than other states.
Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus outbreak in the US continues to grow. So far, more than 40,000 cases have been confirmed across all 50 states, and at least 550 Americans have died.

Testing is a key part of fighting a pandemic - knowing the extent of an outbreak and how quickly it's spreading is an essential piece of information for policymakers, healthcare providers, and the public. After weeks of delays in ramping up its testing, the US is now beginning to roll out testing on a much larger scale. More than 290,000 Americans have been tested for the coronavirus, up from just 10,000 on March 12.

News to stay informed. Advice to stay safe.
Click here for complete coronavirus coverage from Microsoft News

The COVID Tracking Project, a test-tracking resource from two journalists at The Atlantic and the founder of a medical-data startup, publishes frequently updated estimates of the number of tests for the novel coronavirus performed in each state. The project assembles data from state- and local-level public health sources to try to construct the best real-time picture possible of different states' testing systems.

The following map shows how many coronavirus tests each state has done in total since the beginning of the crisis, per 1 million residents (Population estimates come from the Census Bureau.) The data shows that two states with large outbreaks - Washington and New York - have tested the highest shares of their populations.

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#319 Post by chaos » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:19 am

:no:

...

Falwell told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that somewhere between several hundred to more than 5,000 students were expected to be living in Liberty's dorms as classes resumed Monday.

“I think we have a responsibility to our students — who paid to be here, who want to be here, who love it here — to give them the ability to be with their friends, to continue their studies, enjoy the room and board they’ve already paid for and to not interrupt their college life,” he said.

Despite the fact that almost all of Liberty's classes have been moved online, staff and faculty are still expected to come to work as usual.

Falwell noted that the dining halls are operating in a takeout-only capacity and that special classes that need to meet in person, such as labs, will adhere to Gov. Ralph Northam's (D) 10-person gathering limit.

Falwell has given voice to conspiracy theories about the coronavirus. Earlier in the month while on Fox News he said, "You remember the North Korean leader promised us a Christmas present for America? Back in December. Could it be they got together with China and this is that present? I don’t know. But it really is something strange going on."

He told the Times-Dispatch that the university was protecting the students by having them on campus.

“I think we, in a way, are protecting the students by having them on campus together,” he said. “Ninety-nine percent of them are not at the age to be at risk and they don’t have conditions that put them at risk.”

...

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#320 Post by chaos » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:40 am

https://whdh.com/news/who-is-getting-si ... ge-gender/

MARCH 23, 2020
Who is getting sick in Mass.? A look at coronavirus cases by age, gender


Frank O'Laughlin
BOSTON (WHDH) - There are 777 confirmed coronavirus cases in Massachusetts, including 399 men and 378 women, statistics released on Monday show.

In addition to breaking down positive cases by county, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health has started publishing data on the ages of those who have been infected by the virus.

The age group breakdown is as follows:

≤19 years of age – 19 cases
20-29 years of age – 115 cases
30-39 years of age – 132 cases
40-49 years of age- 152 cases
50-59 years of age – 141 cases
60-69 years of age – 111 cases
≥ 70 years of age – 107 cases
Last edited by chaos on Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

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