Coronavirus

Discussion relating to current events, politics, religion, etc
Message
Author
User avatar
Artemis
Posts: 9468
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:44 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: Coronavirus

#761 Post by Artemis » Thu Jul 02, 2020 4:34 pm

WTF?? :mad:



https://www.ctvnews.ca/video?cid=sm%3At ... b70N4yi8-s

People in Alabama are throwing COVID-19 parties with a payout when one gets infected.

Some young people in Alabama are throwing COVID-19 parties, a disturbing competition where people who have coronavirus attend and the first person to get infected receives a payout, local officials said.

The parties are being held in Tuscaloosa, and infected people are urged to attend so others can intentionally contract the virus, City Council member Sonya McKinstry told CNN. She said she heard about the trend from fire officials.

"We thought that was kind of a rumors at first. We did some research, not only do the doctors' offices confirm it, but the state confirmed they also had the same information," she said.

During a presentation to the City Council this week, Fire Chief Randy Smith also said young people in the city are throwing parties with a payout if they catch coronavirus, McKinstry said.

The first person confirmed by a doctor to have coronavirus after the exposure wins the money made off the ticket sales, she said. Over the past few weeks, there have been several parties in the city and surrounding areas, and probably more that officials don't know about, she added.

"It makes me furious," McKinstry said. "Furious to the fact that something that is so serious and deadly is being taken for granted. Not only is it irresponsible, but you could contract the virus and take it home to your parents or grandparents."

The city is working on getting the word out and breaking up such parties. It also passed a mask ordinance this week that goes into effect Monday.

"This is not political. This is a public health issue. People are dying and there is no cure. We have to do whatever we can to save as many lives as possible, McKinstry said.

CNN has reached out to the Alabama Health Department for comment. The state has reported about 39,000 confirmed coronavirus cases and nearly 1,000 deaths.
Another day where cases exceed 50,000 in the US. Tomorrow the 3 million mark will be reached.

clickie
Posts: 3228
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 8:15 am

Re: Coronavirus

#762 Post by clickie » Thu Jul 02, 2020 5:13 pm

Thats a trend in county jails too now. Get Covid and you get an early release.

clickie
Posts: 3228
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 8:15 am

Re: Coronavirus

#763 Post by clickie » Thu Jul 02, 2020 5:19 pm

Mike Tyson is immune to it



clickie
Posts: 3228
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2011 8:15 am

Re: Coronavirus

#764 Post by clickie » Thu Jul 02, 2020 5:34 pm

I punched Iron Mike for not wearing his mask properly

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#765 Post by mockbee » Thu Jul 02, 2020 6:10 pm

Does AL need any State Troopers?

We got some good ones in OR for ya!

:thumb:

User avatar
Larry B.
Posts: 7262
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 6:25 am
Location: Santiago

Re: Coronavirus

#766 Post by Larry B. » Wed Jul 08, 2020 10:47 pm

SOoooo

Haven’t really left the house for more than an hour since March 1st.

Tomorrow, I’ll leane to spend the weekend alone. Everything good in the house, I just finished my semester and felt I needed a few days on my own. I’m taking some recreational stuff with me, and I’ve got plenty of football to watch. Should be a bit relaxing.

Aside from that, it’s good ol’fascist Chile. Not much has changed. Less testing = less results = less positive results, so Jesus is clearly healing us.

User avatar
Bandit72
Posts: 2851
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2011 12:04 am
Location: Birmingham, England

Re: Coronavirus

#767 Post by Bandit72 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 3:46 am

Larry B. wrote:
Wed Jul 08, 2020 10:47 pm
so Jesus is clearly healing us.
It doesn't matter what you do. Your life has already been decided for you. Every decision you make has been pre-determined. You are owned by your creator. And because your "free will" has not allowed you to follow his path, you'll be burning in hell fire for eternity after you die.



















Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaand LOL.

User avatar
Larry B.
Posts: 7262
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 6:25 am
Location: Santiago

Re: Coronavirus

#768 Post by Larry B. » Thu Jul 09, 2020 6:35 am

:lol:

Covid is god’s mysterious ways of helping us cope with bad stuff like global warming, bisexuals, synchronised swimming and the Irish.

User avatar
Artemis
Posts: 9468
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:44 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: Coronavirus

#769 Post by Artemis » Thu Jul 09, 2020 1:20 pm

I went to my first social occasion about 10 days ago. It was supposed to be 5 people and ended up 10. A couple of the people there didn't take COVID seriously and felt that the government was controlling people and business...very similar to the anti-maskers in the US. I declined hug&kiss greetings and got a couple of eye rolls, Also when joints were being passed around, I declined because I didn't want to share saliva. One of the guys rolled me my own and of course there were more eye rolls. Fuck those guys! I would rather be excessive in taking precautions than infecting my mom or getting sick myself. That day I also took the subway and GO train(commuter train) for the first time in over 3 months. I wore a mask and was happy to see that most people did too. The ones who didn't really stuck out and were getting the stink eye. I was an anxious, nervous wreck the whole time though. I have been using the bus regularly but staying within a 5km range from my place and my mom's.
In my my province we are still in stage 2 of opening up businesses. I haven't gone for a haircut or patio drink/meal yet. I'm going to wait and see if there are any spikes or outbreaks first. I'm still working from home but I think my company is planning for a return to the office in the fall. It will be modified, not sure of the details yet. Everything depends on the government regulations and cases remaining low.
Overall, Canada is doing pretty well for the moment. According to the Coronavirus World Meter we've had 308 new cases in the last 24hrs and 9 deaths. Total deaths: 8,746.
I think our border with the US will remain closed until the end of the year for sure, if not longer.

Hope everyone and their loved ones are well. :wave:

User avatar
kv
Posts: 8137
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:08 pm
Location: South Bay, SoCal

Re: Coronavirus

#770 Post by kv » Thu Jul 09, 2020 5:20 pm

Ya getting the same eyerolls from people I played music with till March...their grief isn't gonna matter for shit if you got your mom sick...fuck em

User avatar
chaos
Posts: 4872
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:23 pm
Location: Boston

Re: Coronavirus

#771 Post by chaos » Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:42 am



https://www.yahoo.com/news/mask-resista ... 58176.html

Mask resistance during a pandemic isn't new – in 1918 many Americans were 'slackers'
J. Alexander Navarro, Assistant Director, Center for the History of Medicine, University of Michigan
The Conversation July 13, 2020, 7:53 AM

We have all seen the alarming headlines: Coronavirus cases are surging in 40 states, with new cases and hospitalization rates climbing at an alarming rate. Health officials have warned that the U.S. must act quickly to halt the spread – or we risk losing control over the pandemic.

There’s a clear consensus that Americans should wear masks in public and continue to practice proper social distancing. While a majority of Americans support wearing masks, widespread and consistent compliance has proven difficult to maintain in communities across the country. Demonstrators gathered outside city halls in Scottsdale, Arizona; Austin, Texas; and other cities to protest local mask mandates. Several South Carolina sheriffs have announced they will not enforce their state’s mask order.

I’ve researched the history of the 1918 pandemic extensively. At that time, with no effective vaccine or drug therapies, communities across the country instituted a host of public health measures to slow the spread of a deadly influenza epidemic: They closed schools and businesses, banned public gatherings and isolated and quarantined those who were infected. Many communities recommended or required that citizens wear face masks in public – and this, not the onerous lockdowns, drew the most ire.

Image
Policemen in Seattle, Washington, wearing masks made by the Red Cross, during the influenza pandemic, December 1918 National Archives

In mid-October of 1918, amidst a raging epidemic in the Northeast and rapidly growing outbreaks nationwide, the United States Public Health Service circulated leaflets recommending that all citizens wear a mask. The Red Cross took out newspaper ads encouraging their use and offered instructions on how to construct masks at home using gauze and cotton string. Some state health departments launched their own initiatives, most notably California, Utah and Washington.

Nationwide, posters presented mask-wearing as a civic duty – social responsibility had been embedded into the social fabric by a massive wartime federal propaganda campaign launched in early 1917 when the U.S. entered the Great War. San Francisco Mayor James Rolph announced that “conscience, patriotism and self-protection demand immediate and rigid compliance” with mask wearing. In nearby Oakland, Mayor John Davie stated that “it is sensible and patriotic, no matter what our personal beliefs may be, to safeguard our fellow citizens by joining in this practice” of wearing a mask.

Health officials understood that radically changing public behavior was a difficult undertaking, especially since many found masks uncomfortable to wear. Appeals to patriotism could go only so far. As one Sacramento official noted, people “must be forced to do the things that are for their best interests.” The Red Cross bluntly stated that “the man or woman or child who will not wear a mask now is a dangerous slacker.” Numerous communities, particularly across the West, imposed mandatory ordinances. Some sentenced scofflaws to short jail terms, and fines ranged from US$5 to $200.

Image
Collage of newspaper headlines related to the previous year’s influenza pandemic, Chicago, Illinois, 1919. Headlines include ‘Police Raid Saloons in War on Influenza,’ ‘Flu Curfew to Sound for City Saturday Night’ and ‘Open-Face Sneezers to Be Arrested.’ Chicago History Museum/Getty Images

Passing these ordinances was frequently a contentious affair. For example, it took several attempts for Sacramento’s health officer to convince city officials to enact the order. In Los Angeles, it was scuttled. A draft resolution in Portland, Oregon led to heated city council debate, with one official declaring the measure “autocratic and unconstitutional,” adding that “under no circumstances will I be muzzled like a hydrophobic dog.” It was voted down.

Utah’s board of health considered issuing a mandatory statewide mask order but decided against it, arguing that citizens would take false security in the effectiveness of masks and relax their vigilance. As the epidemic resurged, Oakland tabled its debate over a second mask order after the mayor angrily recounted his arrest in Sacramento for not wearing a mask. A prominent physician in attendance commented that “if a cave man should appear…he would think the masked citizens all lunatics.”

In places where mask orders were successfully implemented, noncompliance and outright defiance quickly became a problem. Many businesses, unwilling to turn away shoppers, wouldn’t bar unmasked customers from their stores. Workers complained that masks were too uncomfortable to wear all day. One Denver salesperson refused because she said her “nose went to sleep” every time she put one on. Another said she believed that “an authority higher than the Denver Department of Health was looking after her well-being.” As one local newspaper put it, the order to wear masks “was almost totally ignored by the people; in fact, the order was cause of mirth.” The rule was amended to apply only to streetcar conductors – who then threatened to strike. A walkout was averted when the city watered down the order yet again. Denver endured the remainder of the epidemic without any measures protecting public health.

Image
Precautions taken during the 1918 flu pandemic would not allow anyone to ride street cars without a mask. Here, a conductor bars an unmasked passenger from boarding. Universal History Archive/Getty Images

In Seattle, streetcar conductors refused to turn away unmasked passengers. Noncompliance was so widespread in Oakland that officials deputized 300 War Service civilian volunteers to secure the names and addresses of violators so they could be charged. When a mask order went into effect in Sacramento, the police chief instructed officers to “Go out on the streets, and whenever you see a man without a mask, bring him in or send for the wagon.” Within 20 minutes, police stations were flooded with offenders. In San Francisco, there were so many arrests that the police chief warned city officials he was running out of jail cells. Judges and officers were forced to work late nights and weekends to clear the backlog of cases.

Many who were caught without masks thought they might get away with running an errand or commuting to work without being nabbed. In San Francisco, however, initial noncompliance turned to large-scale defiance when the city enacted a second mask ordinance in January 1919 as the epidemic spiked anew. Many decried what they viewed as an unconstitutional infringement of their civil liberties. On January 25, 1919, approximately 2,000 members of the “Anti-Mask League” packed the city’s old Dreamland Rink for a rally denouncing the mask ordinance and proposing ways to defeat it. Attendees included several prominent physicians and a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.

Image
Poster of a Red Cross nurse wearing a gauze mask over her nose and mouth – with tips to prevent the influenza pandemic. The National Library of Medicine/NIH

It is difficult to ascertain the effectiveness of the masks used in 1918. Today, we have a growing body of evidence that well-constructed cloth face coverings are an effective tool in slowing the spread of COVID-19. It remains to be seen, however, whether Americans will maintain the widespread use of face masks as our current pandemic continues to unfold. Deeply entrenched ideals of individual freedom, the lack of cohesive messaging and leadership on mask wearing, and pervasive misinformation have proven to be major hindrances thus far, precisely when the crisis demands consensus and widespread compliance. This was certainly the case in many communities during the fall of 1918. That pandemic ultimately killed about 675,000 people in the U.S. Hopefully, history is not in the process of repeating itself today.

This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.

The University of Michigan Center for the History of Medicine received funding from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for a portion of its research on the 1918 influenza pandemic. J. Alexander Navarro was a member of that team of researchers.

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#772 Post by mockbee » Mon Jul 13, 2020 11:50 am

Very Interesting article.... :tiphat:




Image

Image

Image
chaos wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:42 am


https://www.yahoo.com/news/mask-resista ... 58176.html

Mask resistance during a pandemic isn't new – in 1918 many Americans were 'slackers'
J. Alexander Navarro, Assistant Director, Center for the History of Medicine, University of Michigan
The Conversation July 13, 2020, 7:53 AM

..........

Demonstrators gathered outside city halls in Scottsdale, Arizona; Austin, Texas; and other cities to protest local mask mandates.

.....................
Policemen in Seattle, Washington, wearing masks made by the Red Cross, during the influenza pandemic, December 1918 National Archives



....................

Passing these ordinances was frequently a contentious affair. For example, it took several attempts for Sacramento’s health officer to convince city officials to enact the order. In Los Angeles, it was scuttled. A draft resolution in Portland, Oregon led to heated city council debate, with one official declaring the measure “autocratic and unconstitutional,” adding that “under no circumstances will I be muzzled like a hydrophobic dog.” It was voted down.

Utah’s board of health considered issuing a mandatory statewide mask order but decided against it, arguing that citizens would take false security in the effectiveness of masks and relax their vigilance. As the epidemic resurged, Oakland tabled its debate over a second mask order after the mayor angrily recounted his arrest in Sacramento for not wearing a mask. A prominent physician in attendance commented that “if a cave man should appear…he would think the masked citizens all lunatics.”

In places where mask orders were successfully implemented, noncompliance and outright defiance quickly became a problem. Many businesses, unwilling to turn away shoppers, wouldn’t bar unmasked customers from their stores. Workers complained that masks were too uncomfortable to wear all day. One Denver salesperson refused because she said her “nose went to sleep” every time she put one on. Another said she believed that “an authority higher than the Denver Department of Health was looking after her well-being.” As one local newspaper put it, the order to wear masks “was almost totally ignored by the people; in fact, the order was cause of mirth.” The rule was amended to apply only to streetcar conductors – who then threatened to strike. A walkout was averted when the city watered down the order yet again. Denver endured the remainder of the epidemic without any measures protecting public health

......................

In Seattle, streetcar conductors refused to turn away unmasked passengers. Noncompliance was so widespread in Oakland that officials deputized 300 War Service civilian volunteers to secure the names and addresses of violators so they could be charged. When a mask order went into effect in Sacramento, the police chief instructed officers to “Go out on the streets, and whenever you see a man without a mask, bring him in or send for the wagon.” Within 20 minutes, police stations were flooded with offenders. In San Francisco, there were so many arrests that the police chief warned city officials he was running out of jail cells. Judges and officers were forced to work late nights and weekends to clear the backlog of cases.

Many who were caught without masks thought they might get away with running an errand or commuting to work without being nabbed. In San Francisco, however, initial noncompliance turned to large-scale defiance when the city enacted a second mask ordinance in January 1919 as the epidemic spiked anew. Many decried what they viewed as an unconstitutional infringement of their civil liberties. On January 25, 1919, approximately 2,000 members of the “Anti-Mask League” packed the city’s old Dreamland Rink for a rally denouncing the mask ordinance and proposing ways to defeat it. Attendees included several prominent physicians and a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors.


User avatar
Artemis
Posts: 9468
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:44 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: Coronavirus

#773 Post by Artemis » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:59 am

Border closure extended to August 21st.


Image

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#774 Post by mockbee » Thu Jul 16, 2020 7:10 pm

Things going great here.
Going to get much better soon!
:tiphat:


We'll have that border open lickity split. :thumb:

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#775 Post by mockbee » Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:17 pm

Florida has more Covid-19 than most countries in the world. These stats show how serious the problem is

(CNN) — What should be a booming tourist destination this time of year is now riddled with coronavirus, dwarfing other states and even entire countries in some metrics.

Here’s what the situation in Florida looks like:

Florida had more new cases in 1 day than the entire US did in about 2 months
Florida reported its highest number of new Covid-19 cases in one day — 15,300 on Saturday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.


That’s a new record for the most new cases in a single day from any state — including New York state earlier in the pandemic.

It took the entire United States 59 days to top 15,000 combined cases — from January 21 to March 20.

It also took the entire US more than two months from the start of the outbreak to top 15,000 new cases in a single day.


That happened on March 26, when the US had 18,036 new cases in a single day, according to Johns Hopkins data.

Florida has 12x the cases of Australia and South Korea combined
Australia and South Korea both have more people than Florida, but both countries have seen just a fraction of the Covid-19 cases that Florida has.

Australia (population 25 million) has had 9,980 cases of Covid-19, according to data Monday from Johns Hopkins University.

South Korea (population 51 million) has had 13,479 coronavirus cases as of Monday.

Florida (population 21 million) has had 282,435 Covid-19 cases by Monday, according to Johns Hopkins.

In other words, Florida’s Covid-19 cases has topped Australia’s and South Korea’s combined — times 12.

Florida’s Covid-19 death toll is like 10 jumbo jets crashing
At least 4,277 Floridians have died from Covid-19.

A Boeing 747 plane can carry about 400 passengers. That means the coronavirus death toll from Florida is about the same as if 10 jumbo jets crashed, killing everyone on board.

Florida has triple the number of China’s Covid-19 cases
Six months ago, the world thought this new coronavirus was contained to China — specifically, the Wuhan area.

But now, the entire country of China has less than 1/3 the total Covid-19 cases that Florida does, according to Johns Hopkins data. As of Monday, China had 85,117 total cases since the pandemic started, compared to Florida’s 282,435.

Florida has surpassed Italy in Covid-19 cases, too
Italy came under worldwide scrutiny for its handling of Covid-19 as the disease quickly spread out of control.

But after strict government mandates, the country has managed to quell the virus and has largely returned to normal.

As of Monday, Italy (population 60 million) had 243,230 cases from throughout the pandemic. Florida (population 21 million) has already surpassed that number, at 282,435.

Florida’s death toll, however, remains lower than Italy’s — 4,277 in Florida, compared to 34,954 in Italy.

Florida has more Covid-19 cases than most countries
If Florida were a country, it would rank No. 9 in the number of Covid-19 cases worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins data Monday.

Eight countries have higher counts than Florida: the United States, Brazil, India, Russia, Peru, Chile, Mexico, and the United Kingdom.

And more than 100 countries have fewer Covid-19 cases than Florida, including France, Ger

weeeeeeeeeeeeeee........

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#776 Post by mockbee » Thu Jul 16, 2020 10:21 pm

mockbee wrote:
Tue May 26, 2020 9:20 am
There are numerous crazy things about this whole ordeal.

A big one is why Florida and California are tracking about exactly the same (per capita) in infections and deaths. CA is twice the population of FL and has twice the deaths and twice the infections. CA shut down in mid March and is just now reopening, and Florida has been all over the place with packed beaches, NYC refugees, old people packed in every nook and cranny. All because of climate....?

:scared: :noclue:




Guess this got answered. I see a really bad situation brewing in FL with 4.5 million over 65.......

:wavesad:

User avatar
kv
Posts: 8137
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:08 pm
Location: South Bay, SoCal

Re: Coronavirus

#777 Post by kv » Fri Jul 17, 2020 2:25 am

Cap Obvious with the breaking Florida is in trouble news... :bigrin:

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#778 Post by mockbee » Fri Jul 17, 2020 7:29 am


Florida’s death toll, however, remains lower than Italy’s — 4,277 in Florida, compared to 34,954 in Italy


If FL tracks likes NYC.

105,000 deaths over 65 soon.


Which about equals top ten causes of death in a typ florida year.

Provided to you by Capt NotAsObvious
:hehe:
:wink:

:noclue:
FL Leading Causes of Death, 2017 Deaths Rate*** State Rank* U.S. Rate**
1. Heart Disease 46,440 145.8 38th 165.0
2. Cancer 45,131 145.9 38th 152.5
3. Accidents 13,059 56.1 23rd (tie) 49.4
4. Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases 12,619 39.0 33rd 40.9
5. Stroke 12,602 38.9 20th (tie) 37.6
6. Alzheimer’s Disease 6,980 20.7 45th 31.0
7. Diabetes 6,172 20.2 31st 21.5
8. Suicide 3,227 14.0 37th 14.0
9. Kidney Disease 3,172 10.1 33rd 13.0
10. Chronic Liver Disease/Cirrhosis 3,098 11.2 22nd (tie) 10.9


Florida Mortality Data
Florida Mortality Data Deaths Rate** U.S. Deaths U.S. Rate***
Firearm Deaths 2,724 12.4 39,773 12.0
Homicide 1,269 6.4 19,511 6.2
Drug Overdose Deaths 5,088 25.1 70,237 21.7


Other Florida Data
Other Florida Data State U.S.
Infant Mortality Rate (Deaths per 1,000 live births) 6.1 5.8
Marriage Ratepdf icon 7.8 6.9
Divorce Ratepdf icon 3.6 2.9†


* Rankings are from highest to lowest.

User avatar
mockbee
Posts: 3216
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 12:05 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Coronavirus

#779 Post by mockbee » Fri Jul 17, 2020 7:30 am

Tragic for non covid people who need hospital....and health care workers.

Dont do anything stupid ....and dont get sick.
:wavesad:

User avatar
kv
Posts: 8137
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:08 pm
Location: South Bay, SoCal

Re: Coronavirus

#780 Post by kv » Fri Jul 17, 2020 3:02 pm

Easy to say you have no job to go to...a lot it's go to work or don't eat

Post Reply