Now Drinking

off-topic conversation unrelated to Jane's Addiction

Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 12:56 pm

Beer/wine/coffee/cocktail of the evening. Preferably interesting ones.

http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/midtfyns-d ... er/128482/

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The Bottle wrote:Midtfyns Bryghus and Brouwerij De Molen both from the Netherlands shared a stand at the 2010 Copenhagen Beer Festival. Inspired by this collaboation [sic] the brewers decided to create a beer together. The result of Jan and Menno's years of experience and creativity is apparent in this new exciting beer X Porter. This extra porter is a pitch black porter with a long lasting, light brown head. Strong licorice aroma, with coffee and chocolate, some dried fruit, roasted malt and hints of ash and smoke.


I'm trying to get my brain back in writing mode. Porters always make me write, especially when they're strong. This one is very good.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:14 pm

Reminds me a bit of Stryron in Darkness Visible....mainly the first half, but I include his closing thoughts for his intended context. Doesn't seem far off for musicians and drugs/alc.

"There is no need to either rue or apologize for my use of this soothing, often sublime agent, which had contributed greatly to my writing; although I never set down a line under its influence. I did use it-often in conjunction with music-as a means to let my mind conceive visions that unaltered, sober brain has no access to. Alcohol was my invaluable partner of my intellect, besides being a friend whose ministrations I sought daily-sought also, I now see, as a mean to calm the anxiety and incipient dread that I had hidden away for so long somewhere in the dungeons of my spirit."
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:18 pm

I agree with that. Philosophy for me (and likely for most) is an anxiety-driven, obsessive, enterprise. Alcohol definitely can facilitate a kind of anxiolytic frenzy... Obviously editing is best done stone-cold sober...

I'm presenting a paper in four days that has gone through three rewrites and is currently significantly short of where it should be... (by about 20 pages). While I've got a lot of stuff in my head to work with, I've noticed that the pressure of an important milestone (first "open to the public" speaking engagement I've ever done) has led to a stalling of my ordinarily unabashed drive to set thoughts to paper. A third of the way through this beer and it seems to be returning, though.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:25 pm

and research. I too understand Styron here, but there is a point at which it becomes bloated and clumsy in literature.

Anyways back on topic, the window is MUCH smaller, but I suggest Chinaco Reposado as the conduit to brilliance. :lol:
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:32 pm

SR wrote:but there is a point at which it becomes bloated and clumsy in literature.


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Just saying (Love the man... but...)
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:38 pm

Just a slight nudge and he caroms right back into the political philosophy corner. :thumb: I love him too, but the secular humanists have made quite a carnival out of their movement.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 1:44 pm

SR wrote:Just a slight nudge and he caroms right back into the political philosophy corner. :thumb: I love him too, but the secular humanists have made quite a carnival out of their movement.


I refuse to admit that... It is like admitting that "Zionism" is as bad as those who use that epithet indiscriminately think it is -- in both cases, of course, the thoughts are closer to the truth than not. The reason not to admit it is that it feeds into the thought that there is A movement, that there is something funny about it becoming carnivalesque, and so on, when really the human condition itself is the only carousel. The tokenistic secular anti-atheism stuff has always been around (it was true of the "stultii" Cartesians wrt Spinoza, and it was true of many wrt Russell and Ayer... It's just another way to save oneself the trouble of admitting the truth to the naked emperor's face.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Juana » Sun Sep 29, 2013 2:00 pm

2 parts Deep Eddy Grapefruit vodka
2 parts Flor De Cana
Regular Fresca

Served with ice in a 28 oz tumbler
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:01 pm

Adurentibus Spina wrote:
SR wrote:Just a slight nudge and he caroms right back into the political philosophy corner. :thumb: I love him too, but the secular humanists have made quite a carnival out of their movement.


I refuse to admit that... It is like admitting that "Zionism" is as bad as those who use that epithet indiscriminately think it is -- in both cases, of course, the thoughts are closer to the truth than not. The reason not to admit it is that it feeds into the thought that there is A movement, that there is something funny about it becoming carnivalesque, and so on, when really the human condition itself is the only carousel. The tokenistic secular anti-atheism stuff has always been around (it was true of the "stultii" Cartesians wrt Spinoza, and it was true of many wrt Russell and Ayer... It's just another way to save oneself the trouble of admitting the truth to the naked emperor's face.

Yet when I make specific, the 'secular humanists', you know to which movement (of the larger movement, historical or current) I refer. Kurtz, Singer, Harris, Hitch, Dawkins, etc. In stating the evolution of this faction into a joke, I have made no other claims about any other movement nor the human condition as a whole. In any event, the simpler point I was making was simply that as a member of the literary community, I would rather see Hitch placed elsewhere based on the last few years of his active intellectual life....tours, lectures, and group affiliations. It was kind of tongue in cheek.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:11 pm

SR wrote:
Adurentibus Spina wrote:
SR wrote:Just a slight nudge and he caroms right back into the political philosophy corner. :thumb: I love him too, but the secular humanists have made quite a carnival out of their movement.


I refuse to admit that... It is like admitting that "Zionism" is as bad as those who use that epithet indiscriminately think it is -- in both cases, of course, the thoughts are closer to the truth than not. The reason not to admit it is that it feeds into the thought that there is A movement, that there is something funny about it becoming carnivalesque, and so on, when really the human condition itself is the only carousel. The tokenistic secular anti-atheism stuff has always been around (it was true of the "stultii" Cartesians wrt Spinoza, and it was true of many wrt Russell and Ayer... It's just another way to save oneself the trouble of admitting the truth to the naked emperor's face.

Yet when I make specific, the 'secular humanists', you know to which movement (of the larger movement, historical or current) I refer. Kurtz, Singer, Harris, Hitch, Dawkins, etc. In stating the evolution of this faction into a joke, I have made no other claims about any other movement nor the human condition as a whole. In any event, the simpler point I was making was simply that as a member of the literary community, I would rather see Hitch placed elsewhere based on the last few years of his active intellectual life....tours, lectures, and group affiliations. It was kind of tongue in cheek.


I get ya... I'm just tired of dealing with self-satisfied colleagues who attack Dawkins et al., often without even reading what these guys have actually said (and without having remembered/known that there are myriad precedents among our kind). There was a carnival around Einstein too (it was de rigueur while Einstein was alive to ask famous people whether they "understood relativity", and he was often looked to, like Dawkins or Hitchens, as a sort of Oracle... carnivalesque, idiotic, but par for the course, anyway).

I only mentioned Hitchens after your remark because I think he was a perfect example of someone whose immense literary talent could become, as you say, "bloated and clumsy" under too much spirit-influence...
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:18 pm

I get it too. It's just those people who made these tours for Harris, Hitch,and Dawkins, etc into a carny. Bodyguards to keep the screaming teenagers away and more. Rock star intellectuals. :eyes:
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:27 pm

SR wrote:I get it too. It's just those people who made these tours for Harris, Hitch,and Dawkins, etc into a carny. Bodyguards to keep the screaming teenagers away and more. Rock star intellectuals. :eyes:


Oh, indeed. I met them at Toronto in the early 2000s. I recall someone saying of Dawkins: "He's the closest thing we have to a God."... Uh... what?! He's just repeating obvious things Bertrand Russell already said half a century ago... But I also know some people who are glad Dawkins wrote The God Delusion because they're not philosophers and that book helped them make sense of their own beliefs.

Harris is a creepy diletante who needs to go away.

In principle, I admire and value the idea of intellectuals who know how to, and don't mind, speaking to the public (because it's so rare). In practice, it's usually awful.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Artemis » Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:55 pm

I HAD to get a glass of wine because this thread made me thirsty.

I'm drinking this excellent 2012 Riesling from Ontario- love it!


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Style: Off-dry & Fruity
Varietal: Riesling
Sugar Content: 18 g/L

Sweetness Descriptor: M - Medium
Description
This wine is named for the sheep that roam the vineyard tirelessly weeding, mowing the grass and trimming the grape leaves. Discerning and accomplished eaters, they don't feed upon the unripe grapes.

Tasting Note
Rieslings from hot vintages don't get much better than this ... in fact, at this stage there aren't many Rieslings of this quality at this price point, and incredibly Featherstone continues to deliver year after year with their Black Sheep Riesling. According to winemaker/owner David Johnson, he picked these grapes 3 weeks early in order to retain the vibrant acidity. The nose is apple/lime while the palate has a lemon-lime grip on the tongue with lots of mineral and green apple tartness and a long stunning finish. Score - 4 1/2 Stars (out of 5). (Michael Pinkus, ontariowinereview.com, June 12, 2013)
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:00 pm

My favorite grape, hands down.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Artemis » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:03 pm

Well, you've got a make a trip up here some time to try the superb Rieslings that are produced in Ontario. They are world class. :nod:
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:05 pm

Among whites, mine too. Especially the Alsace region.

My favourite red is harder to pick... Pinot noir is so easy to drink that I consider it an easy go-to bottle for most occasions. My favourite table wine is a sangiovese.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:08 pm

Artemis wrote:Well, you've got a make a trip up here some time to try the superb Rieslings that are produced in Ontario. They are world class. :nod:

:rockon:
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:14 pm

Adurentibus Spina wrote:Among whites, mine too. Especially the Alsace region.

My favourite red is harder to pick... Pinot noir is so easy to drink that I consider it an easy go-to bottle for most occasions. My favourite table wine is a sangiovese.

I prefer the Mosul Saar ruwer region, by far. Love Alsace too....totally different style. Reds are difficult. Pn has paced its way out of reach for quality in the last few years. Still Rieslings black equal as the noble grape. Nebbiolo, cab, cab franc, merlot (yes, merlot) and others are just brilliant. Reds have much more depth and dimension thus rendering them occasion or food specific. Drinking alone, I'd likely go with the Barolo or a new priorat.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby Hype » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:24 pm

What does "paced its way out of reach for quality" mean?

I'm inclined to read that as a negative, but I honestly can't be sure... The Mosels are excellent too.
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Re: Now Drinking

Postby SR » Sun Sep 29, 2013 4:32 pm

I might not have phrased that clearly and we've chatted this somewhat in the past. Pn is remarkably temperamental on the vine......and requires great care including low yields to perform to its real potential. The demand has accelerated well beyond its ability to deliver. That said, I know there are low priced, palatable pn's out there but they scarcely resemble the wine at its peak of potential
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