Coronavirus

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#341 Post by chaos » Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:06 am


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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#342 Post by chaos » Thu Mar 26, 2020 11:34 am


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mockbee
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Re: Coronavirus

#343 Post by mockbee » Thu Mar 26, 2020 1:00 pm

Image
Michelle Au works at Emory St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta, Ga. These days she feels like she works at Chernobyl.

As an anesthesiologist, Dr. Au is responsible for one of the most dangerous parts of tending to patients with the coronavirus: intubating those who can’t breathe. The procedure, which involves snaking a tube into the patient’s trachea, is so dangerous because it brings the doctor close to the patient’s mouth, which is constantly shedding the virus. Patients sometimes exhale or cough as the tube is inserted, which aerosolizes the virus, allowing it to hang in the air for several hours.

Last week Dr. Au intubated two patients with Covid-19. “You’re aware of every moment you’re in there,” she told me. “Ten seconds. Twenty seconds. Thirty seconds. You feel radioactive.”

“Have you seen the HBO show ‘Chernobyl’?” she asked. “There are invisible risks that trail you.”

.................................

Early research shows that health care workers are more likely to contract the coronavirus than the average person and, when they get it, to suffer more severe symptoms. Many doctors are already rationing the protective gowns, gloves and masks that are necessary to keep them safe.

They are also drawing up their wills.

Dr. Au and her husband sat down over the weekend and updated the list of who should take care of their children if both of them die. “We have it four deep now,” she said. “The top two choices are older and these people are in a high-risk group. The third person is a doctor. So we added a fourth person who is a low risk for contracting this thing. As the backstop in case it comes to that.”

.......................................

In a sense, Dr. Jackson was built for this moment: Her medical practice and scholarly work are focused on helping patients and their families answer questions like: What does quality of life mean for me? What would I be willing to go through to get more time?

Right now, she says, that conversation comes easily. “It is like the pandemic has allowed patients to be more courageous, more clear.”


.........................................

“You have trusted the system your whole life to keep you safe,” she said. “You keep waiting for the system to kick in. But you realize no one’s coming to save us.”

Dr. Jackson put it this way: “We are standing on the edge of the ocean in the dark. We’re waiting for the wave to hit and we have no idea how high the wave is going to be.”

For now, they are working. Eighty, sometimes 100 hours a week. Days bleed into each other. They don’t stop.

I asked Dr. Bhardwaj if she ever thinks of quitting. “Being a mom now, it’s more challenging than before, because I am responsible for the baby,” she said. “But I wouldn’t change the fact that I’m a doctor. I would never walk away.”

Dr. Au told me she was recently talking to a friend from high school, someone who doesn’t work in medicine. “And he said: ‘How are you feeling aside from all this?’ And I said: ‘There is nothing besides this.’ ”


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/26/opi ... e=Homepage

Heroes............





Though these doctors didn't necessarily sign up for an epidemic, they are still true heroes for going to work each day.

:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:



This is so much better than a war. War is so stupid.

GWB/Cheney and those stupid fucking wars..... :no:


This is God saying FU......


And we are saying FU right back...... :flip:


:drink: :drink: :drink: :drink: :drink: :drink: :drink: :drink: :drink:

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mockbee
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Re: Coronavirus

#344 Post by mockbee » Thu Mar 26, 2020 3:51 pm

I am very saddened by the state of Arts groups across the country and venerable business' folding.

San Francisco Art Institute closure, after 150 years, is especially hard to take.
:balls:
They had a beautiful campus/building in North Beach/Russian Hill and excellent instruction/classes.....
:wavesad:


Image


Image

https://sfai.edu/about-sfai/the-future- ... cb8f9ed854

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Pandemonium
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Re: Coronavirus

#345 Post by Pandemonium » Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:36 pm

On the flip (moron) side, here's my next door neighbors hanging out with some buddies this afternoon without a care in the world:

Image

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Hokahey
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Re: Coronavirus

#346 Post by Hokahey » Thu Mar 26, 2020 5:24 pm

chaos wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 11:34 am
This is misleading, at best. While the city has purchased some of these trucks to potentially utilize, they are precautionary.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... ler-trucks
We’re putting them out near major hospitals as a precautionary measure to prepare for the worst-case scenario,” Worthy-Davis said. “We very much hope we don’t need them.

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Hokahey
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Re: Coronavirus

#347 Post by Hokahey » Thu Mar 26, 2020 5:27 pm

https://www.zmescience.com/medicine/ice ... d-19-0523/
Iceland’s testing suggests 50% of COVID-19 cases are asymptomatic
The small nation might have an important lesson about the pandemic.
by Mihai Andrei
March 26, 2020

The virus is proving to be remarkably stealthy.


Iceland is a small nation of about 364,000 people with strong healthcare and a supportive social system. While most affected countries are only testing those who display severe symptoms, Iceland wants to test everyone in the country for the novel coronavirus.


It can afford to do so in part thanks to its relatively low population, but also due to its well-organized and well-funded medical system. Iceland has currently carried out 10,000 tests — this is far less than what other countries have done, but on a per capita basis, Iceland ranks first in the world.

“Iceland’s population puts it in the unique position of having very high testing capabilities with help from the Icelandic medical research company deCode Genetics, who are offering to perform large scale testing,” Thorolfur Guðnason, Iceland’s chief epidemiologist, told BuzzFeed News.

“This effort is intended to gather insight into the actual prevalence of the virus in the community, as most countries are most exclusively testing symptomatic individuals at this time.”


Not all the results from Iceland’s tests have come through yet, but the ones that have, show that half of all cases are asymptomatic (at the time of testing).

This would suggest that, on one hand, the virus is not as dangerous as we thought, but on the other hand, it would also suggest that it has spread far more than we are currently aware of.

These results are also indicated by a testing survey carried on an entire Italian town of Vo (population 3,300), where the results showed that more than 50% of all cases are asymptomatic.


The whole population of the village was tested, and 3% of the residents tested positive. Then, after a two-week lockdown, the population was tested again. The transmission had been reduced by 90% and the results were confirmed: the majority of cases seem to be asymptomatic.

Luca Zaia, the governor of the Veneto region told Italian media this week:

“We tested everyone, even if the ‘experts’ told us this was a mistake: 3,000 tests. We found 66 positives, whom we isolated for 14 days, and after that 6 of them were still positive. And that is how we ended it.”


This strongly emphasizes the need for mass testing, as quickly as possible.

This is still a rapidly unfolding situation where we are learning new things every day. It’s important to have a bigger-picture understanding of how the infection spreads. Of course, there is a finite government testing capacity, but expanding that capacity can pay great dividends in both the short and the long run.

Similar studies carried on Chinese patients report similar things: the virus is spreading far more than we are anticipating. For every known case, there are five or ten people whose symptoms go undetected.

“Covid-19 is proving to be a “stealth virus” in that we now know a significant amount of transmission is through people who don’t have symptoms. The exact % will depend on setting, but is high enough to make testing and surveillance key tools,” said Dr. Jonathan Quick in a Reddit AMA.

The World Health Organization also urges countries to expand their testing capacity as much as possible.

“You cannot fight the fire blindfolded, and we cannot stop this pandemic if we don’t know who is infected,” director-general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said this week. “We have a simple message for all countries: Test, test, test. Test every suspected case.”

For each and every one of us, there is also an important lesson to apply: we should all act as if we have COVID-19. You may only have a sour throat or a mild cough, you might not have any symptoms at all — you could still be carrying the disease.

As authorities expand testing capacity, and as researchers work on treatments, it’s important that we play our part and prevent the spread of the disease.

I strongly believe the current suggested mortality rates are grossly over exaggerated.

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Hype
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Re: Coronavirus

#348 Post by Hype » Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:45 pm

Yes, so, suppose the death rate is very low. Unlike many other non-novel viruses / diseases, we don't have a treatment that actually works for this one. If you have an underlying condition, and you end up with pneumonia, and there is no ventilator for you, you're dead. That's not like anything we've ever faced before. New York is a shit-show right now.

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Hokahey
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Re: Coronavirus

#349 Post by Hokahey » Thu Mar 26, 2020 8:41 pm

Hype wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:45 pm
Yes, so, suppose the death rate is very low. Unlike many other non-novel viruses / diseases, we don't have a treatment that actually works for this one. If you have an underlying condition, and you end up with pneumonia, and there is no ventilator for you, you're dead. That's not like anything we've ever faced before. New York is a shit-show right now.

Cuomo seems to be walking back a bit just how much of a shit show things really are.

Cuomo: Not sure if closing all businesses, keeping everyone home was 'the best public health strategy'

https://www.foxnews.com/us/cuomo-closin ... h-strategy

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Mescal
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Re: Coronavirus

#350 Post by Mescal » Thu Mar 26, 2020 10:32 pm

Hoka, just out of curiousity: are you a Trump supporter?

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Hype
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Re: Coronavirus

#351 Post by Hype » Fri Mar 27, 2020 4:01 am

Hokahey wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 8:41 pm
Hype wrote:
Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:45 pm
Yes, so, suppose the death rate is very low. Unlike many other non-novel viruses / diseases, we don't have a treatment that actually works for this one. If you have an underlying condition, and you end up with pneumonia, and there is no ventilator for you, you're dead. That's not like anything we've ever faced before. New York is a shit-show right now.

Cuomo seems to be walking back a bit just how much of a shit show things really are.

Cuomo: Not sure if closing all businesses, keeping everyone home was 'the best public health strategy'

https://www.foxnews.com/us/cuomo-closin ... h-strategy
I decided to click on that "article" despite not particularly wanting to give FN the time of day. That is an incredibly misleading selection of partial quotations, and especially a very misleading headline. What he said was that he wasn't *sure*, because we just don't know for sure. But look at what else he says, buried well below the lede:
Addressing reports that New York hospitals were running out of personal protective equipment, Cuomo assured that hospitals had enough in stock for the immediate need, but not beyond. “We have enough PPE in stock for the immediate need, not past it, but for the immediate need.” He added that he was dealing with hospitals who have a need for PPE “today and tomorrow, that’s the kind of time frame we’re dealing with.”
That's written as if there's no problem, but only because the FN writer used "assured". The actual content of it is: given the way this spreads, if there are outbreaks in hospitals, nursing homes, etc., and too many more people need hospitalization, they will run out.

Again, look more carefully:
Cuomo said that while the number of cases continued to go up each day, the slower rate in growth was encouraging. “'We're looking for a reduction in the rate of increase as opposed to the number of absolute cases, that's what we're looking for.”
Fox calls this "encouraging", but it's literally Cuomo saying that the best we can hope for right now is to *slow* the *increase* in numbers. I.e., slow acceleration, not decelerate, not go down. Go up. But slower. Yes. That is the best hope. And the hope is that infrastructure withstands that and we don't run out of equipment that can save lives. And we don't end up with shortages of nurses and doctors because they've all contracted the damn virus.

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Re: Coronavirus

#352 Post by creep » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:13 am

I don't understand why people do not get that it is not about the death rate now or comparing it against another virus. It's about slowing the spread and not overwhelming the health care system. :noclue:

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Re: Coronavirus

#353 Post by clickie » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:21 am

Hey everyone here knows it and thats a start.

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Re: Coronavirus

#354 Post by clickie » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:29 am

My hobbies lately have become laying around watching tv,eating, and staying away from people

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Hype
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Re: Coronavirus

#355 Post by Hype » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:45 am

creep wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:13 am
I don't understand why people do not get that it is not about the death rate now or comparing it against another virus. It's about slowing the spread and not overwhelming the health care system. :noclue:
I think it’s just really hard to imagine what this looks like, until you see it. The public health people and epidemiologists have been warning and trying to explain it for months, but it’s really, really hard to fully grasp what hospitals actually end up looking like when shit hits the fan.

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kv
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Re: Coronavirus

#356 Post by kv » Fri Mar 27, 2020 5:57 am

But, they've been pounding it in our heads for a month plus....everyone sees how we are tracking...why are some in denial? The trump question remains hoka...

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#357 Post by chaos » Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:01 am


An emergency room doctor in Elmhurst, Queens, gives a rare look inside a hospital at the center of the coronavirus pandemic. “We don’t have the tools that we need.”

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Re: Coronavirus

#358 Post by Juana » Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:12 am

chaos wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:01 am

An emergency room doctor in Elmhurst, Queens, gives a rare look inside a hospital at the center of the coronavirus pandemic. “We don’t have the tools that we need.”
I would never ask a friend of mine that is working in the Houston area (displaced himself mind you to do so) to do something like that but he told me its bad

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#359 Post by chaos » Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:23 am

From Gov Cuomo's March 25th press briefing:
...

Andrew Cuomo: (01:08)
Number of infections that have been coming in, 80% still, self resolve. About 15% of the people who test positive require hospitalization. And then there are degrees of hospitalization, right? But the total universe that requires hospitalization is 15%.

Andrew Cuomo: (01:33)
We use projection models. We have Cornell Weill, which is a great medical institution that does projection models. We use McKinsey, that does projection models, Department of Health does projection models. The projection models are important, because they are projecting the possible trajectory and projecting the possible need, right? So we’re planning for a need. The projection models do that. The projection models are just that, they are models of projections. They’re not necessarily definitive, but it’s the only device that we have to plan. Right? Follow the data, follow the data, follow the data.

Andrew Cuomo: (02:13)
The actual hospitalizations have moved at a higher rate than all the projected models. So that was obviously concerning, because that higher infection rate means faster, higher capacity on the hospitals. And that’s the critical point for us, is the number of people going to hospitals.

Andrew Cuomo: (02:43)
Right now what we’re looking at is about 140,000 cases coming into the hospitals. The hospital capacity is 53,000 beds. That’s a problem. We’re looking at about 40,000 ICU cases coming into the hospitals. We have about 3,000 ICU beds. That’s a challenge.

...

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chaos
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Re: Coronavirus

#360 Post by chaos » Fri Mar 27, 2020 6:42 am


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